Your donation helps in Namibia – safely and directly

Democratic structures

Low corruption index – Namibia ranks 5th among all African countries

Relatively stable currency and average economic growth of 4.84% (2012-2016)

Functioning judiciary

Stable private property

Only 2.5 million inhabitants – more than twice the area of Germany

Country with low population, thus great impact for our project

350,000 inhabitants in Windhoek, of which around 135,000 live in informal settlements and the number is rising

Strong expansion of informal settlements on the outskirts of the city due to locals from outside of Windhoek seeking work

Almost a third of the inhabitants live below the poverty line, unemployment rate over 33 %

Your donation helps in Namibia – safely and directly

Democratic structures

Low corruption index – Namibia ranks 5th among all African countries

Relatively stable currency and average economic growth of 4.84% (2012-2016)

Functioning judiciary

Stable private property

Only 2.5 million inhabitants – more than twice the area of Germany

Country with low population, thus great impact for our project

350,000 inhabitants in Windhoek, of which around 135,000 live in informal settlements and the number is rising

Strong expansion of informal settlements on the outskirts of the city due to locals from outside of Windhoek seeking work

Almost a third of the inhabitants live below the poverty line, unemployment rate over 33 %

Namibia

Namibia is a country in southern Africa. The capital and largest city of Namibia is Windhoek. Namibia can look back on more than 100 years of foreign rule, and it was not until 1990 that the country gained its independence after a very long time.

Namibia’s foreign policy is shaped by the guiding principle “no enemies, only friends” – the country tries to maintain balanced diplomatic relations and is committed to multilateral cooperation. Germany and Namibia are linked by their shared colonial history (1884-1915) and maintain a very intensive relationship to this day. However, the relationship with Germany is still burdened by the genocide of the Herero and Nama people, which was committed at the beginning of the 20th century. The country of Namibia has a largely market-oriented economic system, and its main economic sectors are mining, fishing, processing, agriculture and tourism. Every year, almost 100,000 German tourists visit the country, making it the largest non-African tourist group.

A lot has been achieved
Let’s continue to help together

Our donation account: IBAN DE76 5005 0201 0200 7035 10

Our donation account:
IBAN DE76 5005 0201 0200 7035 10

957.000

Katutura means the place where we do not want to live.

The 10th of December is a public holiday in Namibia. This day marks Human Rights Day, but originally it was created to commemorate the forced relocation of the population to a suburb of Windhoek, the township of Katutura. The name comes from the Herero language and means “place where we do not want to live”. Still under South African mandate and its apartheid policy, the black inhabitants of Windhoek were forced out of the city and pushed to live in the townships and informal settlements. Racial segregation officially ended in the 1990s, but even today living conditions in these townships are in part catastrophic.

This is where the idea of Housing! for Future comes in: By actively helping people to help themselves, the aim is to create decent and affordable housing in order to give people an alternative to the living conditions in the informal settlements.

Do you have any questions?

Do you have any questions?